Posts Tagged "cluster headache"

CLUSTER HEADACHES THROUGH THE CHANGING SEASONS.

@Neuralgroover

Cluster headaches are often considered the most severe type of headaches experienced by headache sufferers. It is often referred to as “suicide headache” because it is so severe, and unfortunately quite a few have committed suicide due to the extreme pain.

 

Cluster headache is 1 of 4 types of trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia syndromes (TACs). The headaches within this headache TACs family share some overlapping features, but have distinct differences, and are all treated much differently. So it is important to first properly confirm the diagnosis of cluster headache and clarify that it is not one of the other TACs.  The ICHD3 criteria classify cluster headache as a strictly one sided headache around the eye, temple, forehead which can last anywhere between 15 minutes up to 3 hours. On the same side of the headache, they must be associated with at least one “autonomic feature” which means a tearing and/or red eye, nasal congestion and/or runny nose, eyelid swelling or puffiness, forehead and/or facial sweating, small pupil and/or drooping eyelid. The patient often has a sense of restlessness or agitation and classically paces around the room, sometimes yelling out in pain (in contrast to migraine where the patient often wants to stay still and quiet in bed).

 

They are called cluster headaches because the headaches come in “clusters”. They may be headache free all year and then all of a sudden develop daily headaches which can occur multiple times per day (sometimes up to 8 times per day). They often occur around the same time every night or during the day, often waking the patient up from sleep around the same time nightly. These cycles of daily frequent attacks can last several weeks to several months. The majority of people who suffer from cluster headaches experience them for about 12 weeks each year, most often when the season changes (Summer to Fall and Spring to Summer). It’s one of the most painful types of headaches and is often more intense than a migraine. Let’s take a look at how cluster headaches happen during seasonal changes and what you can do about them.




Why Do Cluster Headaches Happen During the Fall and Spring?

Many people go months or years in between cluster headache cycles. When the cycles start again, they are often tied to changes in the seasons during Fall and Spring. However, cluster headaches can and do certainly come on outside of season changes as well.

 

Changing influences on the body’s biological clock (hypothalamus) have been a long suspected cause of cluster headache, and still felt to be the most likely culprit. Changes in seasons and daylight savings time changes are often associated with cluster headache flares. Daylight savings time changes impact our sleep patterns. When sleep patterns change, this changes the amount of natural light we are exposed to. For a headache sufferer, this can increase headache patterns. Changes in the amount of natural light that a person is exposed to during sleep-wake cycle changes can influence the body’s normal biological rhythms by influencing the hypothalamus. The result for many patients with cluster headache is that the cluster cycle can then be “turned on”.

 

Decreased natural light exposure during the Fall season due to a shorter duration of daylight may also impact a person’s sleep cycle. Loss of sleep may reduce endorphins (our natural pain-killers) in the body and also play a role in reducing the body’s pain tolerance threshold. A study suggested that a loss of 1 to 3 hours of sleep per night over a period of a few days could result in a headache that lasted from anywhere to 1 hour or a day. Migraine is also often very sensitive to inadequate sleep, which is a common trigger.

 

Why Do Seasonal Changes Cause Cluster Headaches

The change in hypothalamic circadian biological rhythms related to changes in sleep-wake cycles and exposure to natural light remain the most commonly suspected cause for cluster headache. However, the exact, true cause of cluster headaches are still not entirely known. Thus, there have been other theories of what causes cluster headaches as well, including changes in barometric pressure, and histamine release related to seasonal allergy changes.

 

There are a lot of headache triggers that happen during the Fall season including decreases in humidity and temperature which are associated with increases in barometric pressure. When you begin getting into Spring, Summer and warmer months, there tends to be more of a decrease in barometric pressure. These barometric pressure changes are classic migraine triggers for many patients. However, a possible relation to cluster headache has also been suggested. The exact barometric pressure that will lead to cluster headaches will vary depending on the individual. For example, a pressure of 1003 to 1007 hPa was found as a migraine trigger point in an NIH study. A specific pressure change of 6 to 10 hPa (the specific drop in air pressure) was also identified as a range in pressure drop that could cause a cluster headache or migraine.

 

Seasonal allergies have also been suggested to possibly play a role in migraines and cluster headaches. Increased allergies during season changes leads to increased histamine levels and sinus symptoms for some people. Deep within the nasal passageways lies some nervous system structures including the olfactory nerves (which allow you to smell), and important headache and facial pain related nerve ganglia, such as the SPG (sphenopalatine ganglia). For example, the SPG is sometimes blocked (SPG block) by numbing medications to abort various types of headache and facial pain including cluster headache, migraine, and trigeminal neuralgia.

 

Seasonal Affective Disorder also could be linked to various types of headaches that one experiences throughout the year. Certain people may experience a predisposition to anxiety and depression due to seasonal changes, and this may lead to headaches and insomnia.

 

Symptoms of Cluster Headaches

Seasonal cluster headaches can start at any age, however, most people tend to start experiencing these between the ages of 20 to 50. They tend to affect men more than women (in contrast to migraine which is the reverse). To review, some of the symptoms of a cluster headache can include:

  • Redness, swelling, and watering/tearing around the eye on the side of the head where the cluster headache is occurring.
  • A stuffed/congested and runny nose on the same side of the headache.
  • Pale skin and sweating.
  • Drooping of the eyelid and small pupil size on the side of the headache.
  • Sense of restlessness or agitation during the attack.

 

Some of the other headaches that a person might experience include anxiety, and waking up at night. Chronic cluster headache sufferers may notice an intensification of their headaches during the change to fall. If you have cluster headaches occurring for one year or longer without remission, or with remission periods lasting less than 3 months, you fall into the chronic cluster category, which is a small minority of cluster headache patients.




How To Alleviate Cluster Headaches That Are Brought On By Seasonal Changes

There are some very basic things that you can do if you suffer from cluster headaches during seasonal changes. Avoiding alcohol and smoking will help reduce the onset of cluster headaches for some. For example, alcohol is a classic trigger for cluster headache when a patient is in a susceptible cluster headache cycle. Sometimes even the smell of alcohol can trigger an attack. When the same person is outside of their cluster cycle, alcohol does not trigger the attack. So for those that drink alcohol and are unsure if their cluster cycle is done (if they are susceptible to an alcohol trigger), consuming alcohol will often let them know! The hormone melatonin can help regulate your sleep cycle, helping you rest better. Some studies have suggested melatonin levels are lower during a cluster cycle. The dose ranges from 5-15 mg taken about 2 hours before bedtime.

 

Otherwise, the key cluster headache treatments involve having a good abortive (as needed) treatment for when an attack happens, and a good preventive treatment to lessen the frequency and severity of attacks. The following treatments are most commonly used for cluster headaches. However, any treatment should be prescribed and discussed with your doctor because you may have other medical conditions which could make some of these treatments dangerous or life-threatening if being used inappropriately. For example, use of triptans or Dihydroergotamine (DHE) in someone with cardiac disease could cause heart attack or stroke. Use of steroids such as prednisone in someone with an ulcer could cause death by gastrointestinal bleed, or in diabetes could lead to diabetic coma and a visit to the intensive care unit due to excess glucose in the blood. Use of oxygen around smoking could cause an explosion. There are many other examples, which is why any treatment should always be provided and discussed first with your regular medical doctor. Also, you should never use treatments given by a friend if they have a similar headache disorder without first consulting with your doctor.

 

Abortive Treatment For Cluster Headaches

In appropriate patients, as soon as a cluster cycle starts, we often use a course of prednisone. Although this can be adjusted depending on the patient’s medical history, I typically start with 70 mg daily in the morning (since often energizing) with food for 3 days, decreasing by 10 mg every 3 days until off. This often helps to break up and shorten a cycle. Occipital nerve block on the same side of the headache for 1-3 days can also be effective in breaking up and shortening a cycle.

 

100% oxygen consumed by a non-rebreather facemask at cluster attack onset at 12-15 liters per minute for 10 to 15 minutes is very effective for many people.

 

Triptans have been a standard treatment abortively for not only migraine, but also for cluster headache. The difference is that oral triptans are not generally prescribed for cluster headache sufferers because the headache will frequently peak after the medication has had the opportunity to be absorbed by the body. Injectable triptans (Sumatriptan) is the fastest acting, often working within minutes. Nasal spray triptans (Sumatriptan, Zolmitriptan) are the next fastest options.

 

Dihydroergotamine (DHE) is also a good option, especially if not responding to triptans or having multiple attacks daily (DHE can last longer). Injection is the most effective, followed by the nasal spray versions).

 

Neuromodulatory devices can also be effective in aborting a cluster attack. GammaCore is a vagus nerve stimulator device that you can carry with you and it is FDA cleared for the abortive treatment of cluster headache. It is the only device currently with this clearance and indication. SPG (sphenopalatine ganglion) blocks can also be done in a variety of ways between the office or under sedation with pain management. There was a small surgically implantable SPG stimulator (implanted through the roof of the mouth) which could be turned on with the press of a button from a handheld device which seemed very promising and effective, but unfortunately got held up and blocked in regulatory processes and red tape. Hopefully this will be revived in the future.

 

Preventive Treatment For Cluster Headaches

Verapamil is often considered the gold standard of cluster headache prevention to try to stop the frequency of attacks and shorten the cluster cycle duration. It is typically started at the onset of a cluster cycle and titrated up to a higher dose depending on how the cluster attacks are responding, and how the patient is tolerating it. This is a blood pressure class of medication, so needs to be used cautiously in those with normal or low blood pressure, or if taking other blood pressure medications. Clinically, it tends to work better in the immediate release form taken three times daily as opposed to the once daily long acting version. I typically start with 40 mg or 80 mg (depending on baseline blood pressure) three times daily and increase by 40 mg every 3 days (assuming no dizziness, lightheadedness, excess fatigue, etc.) until helping or 120 mg three times daily. Although for some patients, much higher doses are required. Checking an EKG is recommended when making higher dose changes to ensure no heart block. Longer-term use of this prescription drug can be considered for chronic cluster headache or high frequency cycles through the year.

 

Emgality (Galcanezumab) ​​is one of the four available CGRP monoclonal antibodies. These are all made for migraine prevention. However, Emgality is unique in that it is currently the only FDA approved medication for prevention of episodic cluster headache. Notably, Emgality dosing is different for cluster headache prevention (300 mg injection per month) compared to migraine prevention (120 mg injection per month).

 

Other types of preventative treatments for cluster headaches include anti-seizure medications, typically starting with Divalproex (Depakote) or Topiramate (Topamax). For more refractory cases, Lithium is sometimes used as well.

 

For some patients (especially chronic cluster headache), unfortunately even these options do not help them and they turn to alternative treatment options. One option that has gained a lot of exposure is the use of tryptamines at sub-hallucinogenic dosing (“microdosing”) including psilocybin (from mushrooms), lysergic acid amide (LSA), and lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD). In fact, there are also growing published studies suggesting benefits of these types of treatments. There is a group called ClusterBusters where these types of treatments are discussed further. Obviously, there are potential legal ramifications of these treatments since they are all federally illegal substances, but for some patients their cluster headache is so severe and refractory that they will do anything for relief.

 

Getting Help For Your Cluster Headaches

Cluster headaches can impact your ability to complete tasks at work and can require you to take more sick leave, as referenced in one study. Cluster headaches can also have an impact on your relationships with family and friends. If you develop cluster headaches your primary care physician might be able to find a viable treatment option or refer you to a headache specialist or neurologist to help you find a solution for your cluster headaches.




IF YOU HAVE HEADACHE, MIGRAINE, OR FACIAL PAIN AND ARE LOOKING FOR ANSWERS ON ANYTHING RELATED TO IT, A HEADACHE SPECIALIST IS HERE TO HELP, FOR FREE!

FIRST, LET’S DECIDE WHERE TO START:

IF YOU HAVE AN EXISTING HEADACHE, MIGRAINE, OR FACIAL PAIN DIAGNOSIS AND ARE LOOKING FOR THE LATEST INFORMATION, HOT TOPICS, AND TREATMENT TIPS, VISIT OUR FREE BLOG OF HOT TOPICS AND HEADACHE TIPS HERE. THIS IS WHERE I WRITE AND CONDENSE A BROAD VARIETY OF COMMON AND COMPLEX  MIGRAINE AND HEADACHE RELATED TOPICS INTO THE IMPORTANT FACTS AND HIGHLIGHTS YOU NEED TO KNOW, ALONG WITH PROVIDING FIRST HAND CLINICAL EXPERIENCE FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF A HEADACHE SPECIALIST.

IF YOU DON’T HAVE AN EXISTING HEADACHE, MIGRAINE, OR FACIAL PAIN DIAGNOSIS AND ARE LOOKING FOR POSSIBLE TYPES OF HEADACHES OR FACIAL PAINS BASED ON YOUR SYMPTOMS, USE THE FREE HEADACHE AND FACIAL PAIN SYMPTOM CHECKER TOOL DEVELOPED BY A HEADACHE SPECIALIST NEUROLOGIST HERE!

IF YOU HAVE AN EXISTING HEADACHE, MIGRAINE, OR FACIAL PAIN DIAGNOSIS AND ARE LOOKING FOR FURTHER EDUCATION AND SELF-RESEARCH ON YOUR DIAGNOSIS, VISIT OUR FREE EDUCATION CENTER HERE.

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Last updated on October 1st, 2021 at 02:07 pm

SUMMER HEADACHES AND SUMMER MIGRAINES.

@Neuralgroover

The likelihood of a headache increases during the summer months. According to a recent study which surveyed ER visits for headaches, every 9°F rise in temperature increased a person’s short-term risk of a headache by about 7.5% before their emergency room visit. Heat, dehydration, weather changes and barometric pressure changes are the primary drivers of headaches during the summer months, but some lifestyle factors, such as the foods we eat during the summer, can also increase the risk of headaches.




Heat, Headaches, and the Weather

During the summer months, heat can be a contributor to both headaches and migraines. In certain areas of the country where barometric pressures can change suddenly during a storm, people frequently report headaches. This is a common and classic migraine trigger. Sometimes a headache may be caused by heat exhaustion, which has the following associated symptoms:

  • Dizziness
  • Muscle cramps or tightness
  • Numbness in the face and neck
  • Fainting
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Cold, clammy, pale skin
  • Fast and weak pulse
  • Weakness or tiredness
  • Drenching sweat
  • Extreme thirst

For a summer headache that is not related to heat exhaustion, your symptoms may only include a throbbing or dull achy sensation in your head, fatigue, sensitivity to light, and dehydration. If you do have heat exhaustion, it is best to seek medical help because heat exhaustion can lead to heat stroke.

 

Relief for Heat and Weather-Related Headaches

For people prone to headaches and migraines triggered by heat, there are some ways to mitigate them. It might be wise to limit outdoor times on hotter days. Sunglasses, a hat, and sunscreen can also help. If you need to exercise, try to stay indoors in an air-conditioned environment. Sports drinks that contain electrolytes and plenty of water will also help you stay hydrated. If you already are suffering from a heat-related headache, certain essential oils, cold compresses, iced herbal teas (without caffeine), and NSAIDs can help reduce the intensity of the headache.

 

Exercise and Summer Headaches

Heat and exercise are often a combination of conditions for a headache, but if you choose to exercise, there are certain things that you can do to avoid getting a headache. Generally speaking, it is understood that when a person exercises, the blood vessels within their skull dilate. If you participate in strenuous activities, like rowing, running, weight lifting, or team sports (like baseball, softball, or volleyball), these can contribute to a headache.

Avoiding activities like these in high heat is advisable. However, another way to avoid headaches related to exercise is to develop a set of warm up exercises, which can help prevent headaches. Some good warmup exercises include stretches, followed by some light jogging and walking.




The Importance of Staying hydrated To Prevent Headaches

As a rule of thumb, people have generally learned that you should drink at least eight 8-ounce glasses of water each day. That is about two liters. However, during hot summer days when you are active, you might need to increase that to about 2-½ liters. When you are dehydrated, the brain can shrink and this causes the brain to pull away from the skull, causing a headache. When you relieve your dehydration, the brain returns to a normal state, relieving the headache.

 

Pollution, Allergens, and Summer Headaches

During the summer months, there are also other factors, like pollution and allergens, that can lead to headaches. Various air pollutants tend to increase during the summer months due to more people traveling and there being vehicles on the road. Lead, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and particulate matters all increase during the summer months and can cause headaches. Headaches that are related to pollution are often intense, sometimes leading to the point of being disabling, because they are often migraine. Pollution irritates the lungs, eyes, and triggers what is sometimes a very intense headache.

Allergy headaches have unique symptoms. Sometimes a person may experience pain localized over the sinus area and some other facial pain. More intense headaches can be throbbing and one-sided and sometimes are accompanied by nausea, and these are more likely to represent migraine.

Foods and Headaches During the Summer

More people typically barbecue and picnic during the summer months. Certain “summer foods” can trigger headaches. For example, hot dogs can potentially trigger headaches because of nitrites. Nitrites are generally present in some foods in very small quantities, but sensitivity will vary depending upon the person to this chemical. Processed meats like salami and bacon also can contain varying levels of nitrites. In this situation, it is best to substitute processed meats for something like a salad. Even the condiments that you put on your food can trigger headaches. Instead of pickles, you might want to consider swapping them for fresh vegetables on your burger. Avoid aged cheeses and try fresh herbs instead of soy-based condiments. More detailed discussion of migraine triggers can be found here.

 

Sunburn and Headaches

Generally, when we get sunburn, we think nothing of it and it goes away within a few days. However, sunburn can be more severe in certain types of situations. When swimming, sunburn is often more intense if you don’t use sunscreen. Sunburn can happen relatively quickly, within just 10 to 15 minutes of sun exposure. Some of the symptoms that you can get with severe sunburn include:

  • Tenderness and blistering of the skin
  • Pain and tingling sensations in the burned area
  • Headaches, fevers and chills
  • Nausea, dizziness, and dehydration.

The type of headache that accompanies a severe sunburn can sometimes feel like exhaustion and will often cover the entire head. To relieve a sunburn headache, cool/cold treatments can often help alleviate the intensity, including cold compresses, a cold shower, and drinking water.

 

Taking Care of Headaches During the Summer

Headaches are more frequent during the late spring and summer months. By drinking plenty of water, staying hydrated, regulating our exposure to sunshine, paying attention to food triggers, and not overexerting ourselves, we can reduce the potential for frequent and intense headaches. However, even with taking these precautions, headaches and migraines will still periodically happen. Thus, it is important to have a good abortive headache treatment such as the gepants (Ubrelvy, Nurtec ODT), Ditans (Reyvow)triptans, or regular over the counter (OTC) pain medicines such as acetaminophen, aspirin, ibuprofen, or naproxen if they work for you and if you can use them safely. If the headache frequency is high enough (generally more than 4 per month), a preventive headache or migraine treatment should be considered until your high frequency headache cycle subsides.




IF YOU HAVE HEADACHE, MIGRAINE, OR FACIAL PAIN AND ARE LOOKING FOR ANSWERS ON ANYTHING RELATED TO IT, A HEADACHE SPECIALIST IS HERE TO HELP, FOR FREE!

FIRST, LET’S DECIDE WHERE TO START:

IF YOU HAVE AN EXISTING HEADACHE, MIGRAINE, OR FACIAL PAIN DIAGNOSIS AND ARE LOOKING FOR THE LATEST INFORMATION, HOT TOPICS, AND TREATMENT TIPS, VISIT OUR FREE BLOG OF HOT TOPICS AND HEADACHE TIPS HERE. THIS IS WHERE I WRITE AND CONDENSE A BROAD VARIETY OF COMMON AND COMPLEX  MIGRAINE AND HEADACHE RELATED TOPICS INTO THE IMPORTANT FACTS AND HIGHLIGHTS YOU NEED TO KNOW, ALONG WITH PROVIDING FIRST HAND CLINICAL EXPERIENCE FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF A HEADACHE SPECIALIST.

 

IF YOU DON’T HAVE AN EXISTING HEADACHE, MIGRAINE, OR FACIAL PAIN DIAGNOSIS AND ARE LOOKING FOR POSSIBLE TYPES OF HEADACHES OR FACIAL PAINS BASED ON YOUR SYMPTOMS, USE THE FREE HEADACHE AND FACIAL PAIN SYMPTOM CHECKER TOOL DEVELOPED BY A HEADACHE SPECIALIST NEUROLOGIST HERE!

 

IF YOU HAVE AN EXISTING HEADACHE, MIGRAINE, OR FACIAL PAIN DIAGNOSIS AND ARE LOOKING FOR FURTHER EDUCATION AND SELF-RESEARCH ON YOUR DIAGNOSIS, VISIT OUR FREE EDUCATION CENTER HERE.

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Last updated on October 1st, 2021 at 02:04 pm

ONE-SIDED HEADACHE WITH CONGESTED RUNNY NOSE, OR RED, TEARING AND SWOLLEN EYE. 5 REASONS WHY.

@Neuralgroover

BACKGROUND

Do you have a one-sided headache, left-sided headache, right-sided headache, or one-sided head pain with some variation of one-sided symptoms such as runny nose, nasal congestion or stuffiness, red eye, tearing eye, droopiness of the eyelid, puffiness or swelling around the eye, facial sweating or flushing, or clogged ear feeling? These symptoms are called autonomic symptoms, and they are a central part of several distinct headache syndromes. The headaches that occur with this combination of features are distinct types of headaches, all requiring different treatments. Therefore, it is important in differentiating them to ensure proper treatment and less misery!




TRIGEMINAL AUTONOMIC CEPHALALGIAS (TACs)

There is a class of headaches called the trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs), and all are terribly painful. There are 4 types of headaches within the TAC family, and include cluster headache, hemicrania continua, paroxysmal hemicrania, and SUNCT / SUNA (Short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing / Short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with cranial autonomic symptoms). All of the TAC syndromes warrant preferably a brain MRI and MRA to exclude other causes such as pituitary lesions, aneurysms, or other abnormalities.

 

The TACs all share 2 common and core features. 1st, they are characterized by a severe headache that is strictly one-sided and focused around the eye, behind the eye, below the eye, in the temple or forehead areas. 2nd, they must include at least 1 autonomic symptom on the same side of the headache [lacrimation (runniness/tearing of the eye), conjunctival injection (redness of the eye), facial sweating or flushing (skin turning blushed), nasal congestion, rhinorrhea (runniness of nose), sense of ear fullness, eyelid edema (swelling), or partial Horner’s syndrome (miosis (pupil becomes small)) and/or ptosis (droopiness of the eye)].

 

So how do you differentiate these headache types when they all have similar features? Differentiation between them is based purely on their headache attack duration and pattern. So, it is actually quite easy to differentiate them as contrasted below.

 

CLUSTER HEADACHE

Cluster headache is the most common TAC syndrome and is discussed and detailed further here. It is characterized by attacks of severe unilateral (one-sided) orbital (around the eye), supraorbital (above the eye), and/or temporal pain lasting 15 to 180 minutes if untreated. There is either agitation/restlessness with the headache attack and/or at least 1 autonomic sign or symptom on the side of the headache as described above. Headache attacks typically occur from 1 every other day to 8 per day for more than half the time during a cluster cycle.  Chronic cluster headache is defined by attacks that occur for more than 1 year without remission, or with remission periods lasting less than 1 month.

 

Cluster headache attacks occur in “clusters”, or cycles, of frequent headache attacks. These cycles of cluster attacks may last for weeks or months before they go away completely. Within a cluster cycle, patients may get multiple attacks during the day or overnight. They often classically wake the patient up in the middle of sleep, usually around the same time every night or morning. The patient often gets up and paces around the house in agitated misery. They certainly can occur during the day as well. Remission periods can last months to years. Cluster cycles often occur at a predictable time of year, such as season changes (Fall and Spring are most common). Men tend to be affected 3 times more than women, but it is seen in both men and women. It is a severely painful headache, and has been termed “suicide headache” because of the pain severity.

 

Treatment of cluster headache is detailed further here.

 

HEMICRANIA CONTINUA

Hemicrania continua a continuous daily one-sided headache (side-locked, does not alternate sides) of at least 3 months duration with moderate to severe exacerbations. There should be either agitation or restlessness and/or at least 1 autonomic sign or symptom on the side of the headache as described above. Although not included in the criteria, sometimes patients describe a sensation such as something irritating in the eye on the side of the headache, such as sand, grit, or a hair, but nothing is found. Hemicrania continua is discussed and detailed further here.

 

To make the full diagnosis of hemicrania continua, the patient must respond completely to a therapeutic trial of indomethacin (a specific anti-inflammatory (NSAID) medication), used in a very specific way (“Indomethacin trial”). For this reason, this headache is 1 of 2 types of “Indomethacin-sensitive” headaches because Indomethacin is typically the only thing that works (paroxysmal hemicrania is the other Indomethacin-sensitive headache). The diagnosis of hemicrania continua is confirmed by the headache completely stopping after reaching a specific dose of Indomethacin.

 

Besides indomethacin, other treatments of hemicrania continua are detailed further here.

 

PAROXYSMAL HEMICRANIA

Paroxysmal hemicrania is characterized by attacks of severe unilateral (one-sided) orbital (around the eye), supraorbital (above the eye), and/or temporal pain lasting 2 to 30 minutes. There must be at least 1 autonomic sign or symptom on the side of the headache as described above. The attacks have a frequency of more than 5 per day for more than 50% of the time when the disorder is active.  Chronic paroxysmal hemicrania continua is defined by attacks occurring for more than 1 year without remission, or with remission periods lasting less than 1 month. Paroxysmal hemicrania is discussed and detailed further here.

 

To make the full diagnosis of paroxysmal hemicrania, the patient must respond completely to a therapeutic trial of indomethacin (a specific anti-inflammatory (NSAID) medication), used in a very specific way (“Indomethacin trial”). For this reason, this headache is 1 of 2 types of “Indomethacin-sensitive” headaches because Indomethacin is typically the only thing that works (hemicrania continua is the other “Indomethacin-sensitive” headache). The diagnosis of paroxysmal hemicrania is confirmed by the headache completely stopping after reaching a specific dose of Indomethacin.

 

Besides indomethacin, other treatments of paroxysmal hemicrania are detailed further here.

 

SUNCT / SUNA

SUNCT/SUNA are two variations of a rare type of headache called short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks, and they are discussed and detailed further here. Short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks (which include SUNCT and SUNA) are characterized by moderate to severe unilateral (one-sided) orbital (around the eye), supraorbital (above the eye), and/or temporal pain. The duration of the pain lasts for 1–600 seconds (1 second to 10 minutes, although most often about 5 seconds to 4 minutes), and may occur as single stabs, series of stabs, or in a sawtooth pattern. There must be at least 1 autonomic sign or symptom on the side of the headache as described above. Attacks must have a frequency of at least one per day for more than half of the time when the disorder is active. However, the attacks generally occur in a very high daily frequency when active, sometimes even up to 200 attacks per day or 5-6 attacks per hour.

 

SUNCT and SUNA both share the above criteria. The difference between the two is that SUNCT requires both conjunctival injection (redness of the eye) and lacrimation (runniness/tearing of the eye), whereas SUNA requires only 1 or neither of these 2 features.

 

Treatment of SUNCT / SUNA is detailed further here.




MIGRAINE

Migraine is not a TAC syndrome, but it can sometimes have overlapping characteristics with the TACs in terms of its one-sided nature and associated autonomic features in some patients. For this reason, I have included it in this discussion. Migraine is discussed and detailed further here. The autonomic symptoms seen in migraine are not required by criteria for diagnosis, in contrast to the TAC syndromes which do require these symptoms for diagnosis. In some patients with migraine, their headache attacks can have some of the autonomic features described above. For many patients, migraine also activates the sinus pathways, so sinus symptoms of sinus/facial pressure, congestion and drainage are common. This is often misdiagnosed as “sinus headache”. However, if there is any throbbiness, pulsating, or pounding, it is almost guaranteed to actually be of a migraine origin rather than of a sinus origin.

 

Migraine headache attacks last 4 to 72 hours if untreated or unsuccessfully treated. There must be 2 of the following 4 features present: a unilateral (one-sided) headache, pounding/throbbing/pulsating quality, moderate-to-severe pain intensity, and worsening by routine physical activity. There must also be 1 of the following 2 features present: nausea and/or vomiting, or both photophobia (sensitivity to light) and phonophobia (sensitivity to sound).

 

Treatment of migraine headache is detailed further here.

 

 

IF YOU HAVE HEADACHE, MIGRAINE, OR FACIAL PAIN AND ARE LOOKING FOR ANSWERS ON ANYTHING RELATED TO IT, A HEADACHE SPECIALIST IS HERE TO HELP, FOR FREE!

FIRST, LET’S DECIDE WHERE TO START:

IF YOU HAVE AN EXISTING HEADACHE, MIGRAINE, OR FACIAL PAIN DIAGNOSIS AND ARE LOOKING FOR THE LATEST INFORMATION, HOT TOPICS, AND TREATMENT TIPS, VISIT OUR FREE BLOG OF HOT TOPICS AND HEADACHE TIPS HERE. THIS IS WHERE I WRITE AND CONDENSE A BROAD VARIETY OF COMMON AND COMPLEX  MIGRAINE AND HEADACHE RELATED TOPICS INTO THE IMPORTANT FACTS AND HIGHLIGHTS YOU NEED TO KNOW, ALONG WITH PROVIDING FIRST HAND CLINICAL EXPERIENCE FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF A HEADACHE SPECIALIST.

 

IF YOU DON’T HAVE AN EXISTING HEADACHE, MIGRAINE, OR FACIAL PAIN DIAGNOSIS AND ARE LOOKING FOR POSSIBLE TYPES OF HEADACHES OR FACIAL PAINS BASED ON YOUR SYMPTOMS, USE THE FREE HEADACHE AND FACIAL PAIN SYMPTOM CHECKER TOOL DEVELOPED BY A HEADACHE SPECIALIST NEUROLOGIST HERE!

 

IF YOU HAVE AN EXISTING HEADACHE, MIGRAINE, OR FACIAL PAIN DIAGNOSIS AND ARE LOOKING FOR FURTHER EDUCATION AND SELF-RESEARCH ON YOUR DIAGNOSIS, VISIT OUR FREE EDUCATION CENTER HERE.




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TYPES OF HEADACHES.


Posted By on Mar 16, 2021

Last updated on September 17th, 2021 at 06:45 am

TYPES OF HEADACHES – 2021

@Neuralgroover

According to the World Health Organization, headaches are a global problem, affecting people of all races, income levels, and regional areas. Headache disorders impact about 50% of people worldwide. Moreover, it is estimated that 50% to 75% of adults aged 18 to 65 have suffered from a headache or a migraine within the last year. A smaller percentage of people worldwide, 1.7% to 4%, have headaches that last for two weeks or longer. Let’s take a look at the four different types of headaches, what causes them, and some common treatments that may relieve them.

The Four Different Types of Headaches

There are, in fact, 150+ different types of headaches. However, the four most common types of headaches are: tension headaches, migraine headaches, sinus headaches, and cluster headaches.

 

What Are Tension Headaches?

Tension headaches typically are moderate to mild in nature and can be best described as feeling like a tight band around one’s head. By and far, these are the most common types of headaches and their origins are not well understood. Common symptoms include a dull, aching, pressure pain in both sides of your head; tightness in your forehead, sides, and back of your head; and muscle soreness in your shoulder, neck, and scalp. They can not be a throbbing pain. If there is any throbbiness to the headache, it takes it out of tension type headache criteria and moves it into migraine criteria. Tension type headaches are not worsened by physical activity, in contrast to migraine which are. Tension type headaches should not be associated with nausea or vomiting, in contrast to migraine which can be. There may be some mild sensitivity to light (photophobia) or sound (phonophobia), but tension type headache should not have both. In contrast, migraine requires both features.

 

What Are Sinus Headaches?

Sinus headaches are usually indicated by pressure around your eyes, cheeks, and forehead. You may also experience a throbbing forehead. However, these features can also be consistent with migraine because in general, any type of throbbing pain places the headache into the migraine category. In fact, there was a large study done in the past in which almost all of the patients with either self-diagnosed or physician-diagnosed sinus headache turned out to actually be migraine headache.  Migraine also activates the sinus pathways and cavities and can cause referred pain into the teeth and TMJ areas. So for many patients, their migraines include a lot of sinus type symptoms. Therefore, it is easy to see how migraine often gets mistaken for sinus headache. For some people with true sinus headache, they feel like a sinus infection. Historically, the existence of true “sinus headaches” has been a debatable topic, and it’s presence generally revolves around whether there is an ongoing sinus infection or not. If there is, this can certainly be a source of headache, and it is typically associated with fevers and drainage (often colored, purulent discharge).  Some common symptoms include:

  • Fatigue
  • A stuffy sensation in your nose
  • Pain and pressure in your cheeks, brows, and forehead.

What Are Cluster Headaches?

Cluster headaches are called as such because they happen over cyclic time frames or “clusters.” These types of headaches can wake you up in the middle of the night and they frequently happen on one side of your head or near an eye. The pain of cluster headaches is severe, and they have been termed “suicide headaches” because of the severity of the pain. Cluster headaches are more rare than other types of headaches. Some symptoms include:

  • Pain that is situated around or behind one eye
  • One-sided pain, versus other headaches where the sensation of pain is often more global
  • Stuffy or runny nose on the side of your head that hurts
  • Red and tearing eye on the side of the head that is impacted
  • Restlessness

What Are Migraine Headaches?

Migraine headaches, according to some patients, are the worst type of headache. These types of headaches are characterized by a throbbing sensation, most commonly one one side of the head, but can also be both sides. Additionally, they often come with nausea, sometimes vomiting, and a sensitivity to light and sound. Migraines come in stages, but not everyone goes through all the stages.

The stages of migraines include:

  • Prodrome: Some mild symptoms that indicate an oncoming migraine attack, including neck stiffness, moodiness, food cravings, and other subtle symptoms. This may occur even a day or more before the attack starts.
  • Aura: Seeing bright lights or various shapes, numbness and tingling, speech disturbances, overall weakness, and other symptoms that happen right before or during the onset of a migraine. About 25% of patients get aura (classic migraine), while 75% get no aura (common migraine).
  • Attack: During a migraine attack, migraine sufferers typically experience the worst symptoms, including pain on one side of the head, nausea, and other symptoms. A migraine attack itself can last for up to 72 hours.
  • Post-Drome: After the migraine, people tend to experience tiredness and sudden head movement can bring on some pain. At this stage, people report excess fatigue, generalized soreness, and commonly report feeling like they were “hit by a bus”.

Migraines can be read about in much more detail here.

Common Questions About the Various Types of Headaches

What causes the various different types of headaches?

There is not a singular known medical cause for headaches. Primary headaches are when the headache itself is the primary health issue that the sufferer is dealing with. Secondary headaches are those that are caused by a medical condition (such as a brain tumor). Let’s take a look at what the most common causes are for the various types of headaches:

  • Tension headaches: These can be caused by stress, depression, injury, or other issues.
  • Sinus headaches: These headaches are most commonly caused by sinusitis and allergies.
  • Cluster headaches: The exact cause of cluster headaches are unknown, but it may have something to do with biological processes since cluster headaches are cyclical.
  • Migraines: As with other types of headaches, there migraines don’t have a clear cause. Common suspected causes include hormones, diet, dehydration, and other physical or lifestyle factors.

When should you seek medical attention/advice for any type of headache?

You should seek medical attention/advice when you have any type of headache. Sometimes, a headache may be indicative of a larger medical problem. At least one visit with your doctor is recommended for any type of headache because even secondary headaches (caused by a medical condition) can sometimes present as a standard primary type of headache. A visit with your doctor may uncover additional information from a more detailed history during questioning and neurological physical exam. Repeat headaches can impact the quality of your life and should be treated. Sometimes, your regular doctor may not know how to adequately deal with a headache. Some doctors are especially trained to deal with headaches, specifically headache specialists.

What type of headaches should a headache sufferer worry about?

Generally speaking, any type of headache should be a cause for concern. However, there are certain situations where headaches may be indicative of a larger, more serious medical issue. Headaches associated with the following symptoms should be a cause for concern:

  • A high fever, chills, night sweats, neck stiffness
  • The sudden onset of very intense headache pain (thunderclap headache) with peak headache intensity in less than a minute
  • Fainting, disorientation, or loss of balance or equilibrium
  • Weakness on any side of the body or any other neurological symptoms including visual loss or vision changes, double vision, trouble swallowing, numbness, tingling, speech disturbances (slurred speech, trouble getting words out, trouble understanding speech), vertigo, behavioral or personality changes
  • Nosebleeds
  • Pulsatile tinnitus or papilledema (swelling of optic nerve on eye exam)
  • Other issues, such as weight loss, vision issues, jaw cramping, and other factors
  • History of cancer, immunosuppression, HIV
  • New onset headaches under age 5 or over age 50
  • Headaches triggered by Valsalva maneuvers (coughing, straining, laughing, bending forward, exertion, exercise, sexual activity, bearing down such as during a bowel movement)
  • Progressive worsening and changing of headaches into a higher frequency or daily frequency
  • Postural worsening of headache (worsens when standing and improves when lying down, or worsens when lying down, improves when standing up)

What are some common tests for the more serious types of headaches?

Some headaches, such as cluster headaches, are not commonly understood. Other types of headaches may have an underlying cause. If you see a neurologist or other medical specialist, you might experience some of the following tests for them to better diagnose and understand the underlying cause of your headache:

  • Eye & ear exam
  • CT scan
  • MRI scan
  • EEG scan
  • Blood and spinal fluid tests

A headache specialist will often try and get access to your medical records and history so that they can better treat your condition.

Which type of doctor commonly deals with the various types of headaches?

Neurologists are the most common type of specialized doctor that headache sufferers see. However, they will often refer to a headache specialist for more complex headache and facial pain disorders, or if treatments are not helping the patient. General medical practitioners may be able to make a referral and provide some basic treatment, as they are often the first line of headache evaluations. On occasion, an ENT doctor may provide treatment for secondary headaches that are related to sinus and ear issues.

 

IF YOU HAVE HEADACHE, MIGRAINE, OR FACIAL PAIN AND ARE LOOKING FOR ANSWERS ON ANYTHING RELATED TO IT, A HEADACHE SPECIALIST IS HERE TO HELP, FOR FREE!

FIRST, LET’S DECIDE WHERE TO START:

IF YOU HAVE AN EXISTING HEADACHE, MIGRAINE, OR FACIAL PAIN DIAGNOSIS AND ARE LOOKING FOR THE LATEST INFORMATION, HOT TOPICS, AND TREATMENT TIPS, VISIT OUR FREE BLOG OF HOT TOPICS AND HEADACHE TIPS HERE. THIS IS WHERE I WRITE AND CONDENSE A BROAD VARIETY OF COMMON AND COMPLEX  MIGRAINE AND HEADACHE RELATED TOPICS INTO THE IMPORTANT FACTS AND HIGHLIGHTS YOU NEED TO KNOW, ALONG WITH PROVIDING FIRST HAND CLINICAL EXPERIENCE FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF A HEADACHE SPECIALIST.

 

IF YOU DON’T HAVE AN EXISTING HEADACHE, MIGRAINE, OR FACIAL PAIN DIAGNOSIS AND ARE LOOKING FOR POSSIBLE TYPES OF HEADACHES OR FACIAL PAINS BASED ON YOUR SYMPTOMS, USE THE FREE HEADACHE AND FACIAL PAIN SYMPTOM CHECKER TOOL DEVELOPED BY A HEADACHE SPECIALIST NEUROLOGIST HERE!

 

IF YOU HAVE AN EXISTING HEADACHE, MIGRAINE, OR FACIAL PAIN DIAGNOSIS AND ARE LOOKING FOR FURTHER EDUCATION AND SELF-RESEARCH ON YOUR DIAGNOSIS, VISIT OUR FREE EDUCATION CENTER HERE.

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Last updated on September 17th, 2021 at 06:43 am

WAKING UP WITH HEADACHES: 6 TYPES OF WAKE UP HEADACHES.

@Neuralgroover

 

WAKE UP HEADACHE

Do you frequently wake up with a headache? This is a common feature with several types of headache disorders, but they are all distinct headache types with completely different treatments. Let’s discuss the 6 most common types of wake up headaches and the reasons why you may be waking up with headaches.

 

1) MIGRAINE

Migraine commonly causes wake up headaches for many patients, and is by far THE most common cause of wake up headaches. Sleep stage transitions can be a trigger for migraine attacks in many patients. Migraine is also susceptible to changes in sleep patterns. So for many, sleeping in (such as on the weekends or on vacation) can be a common (and cruel) migraine trigger leading to waking up with headaches. Thus, trying to maintain a similar sleep schedule on the weekends and weekdays can help with this type of trigger.

 

Other causes of wakeup headache commonly occur in patients that are stuck in chronic migraine (15-30 days per month with at least 8 headache days with migraine features), particularly if they are in rebound headache (medication overuse headache) from excess pain or “as-needed” medications. This occurs when a person with migraine is using triptans, OTCs (over-the-counter pain meds), or NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) more than 10 days per month, opiates or opioids more than 8 days per month, or butalbital medications such as fioricet or fiorinal more than 5 days per month, on average. Rebound headache occurs because as the patient is sleeping, the overused medication is being metabolized and eliminated from the body and the headache (typically migraine) is triggered as a result of withdrawal from the medication and the need to take more. Patients in this cycle will often notice that after they take their overused medication, the headache calms back down again. It starts to worsen again as they are due for another dose and it is wearing off. This pattern is characteristic for rebound headache. Caffeine withdrawal headache can also be a cause of wake up headaches, for similar reasons as described for rebound headache.

 

Treatments for migraine are discussed here. The key for abortive (as-needed) migraine treatment for waking migraines is that is must be something fast acting to have a chance to catch the migraine. The difficulty with waking migraines is that you are already “behind the ball” by the time you wake with the migraine because you’ve missed the early treatment window where most medications such as the triptans would normally be most effective. So for waking migraines, injectable Sumatriptan (Imitrex), nasal Zolmitriptan (Zomig) or Sumatriptan (Imitrex), are typically going to be the most effective triptans. With that said, sometimes patients can get away with a fast-acting oral triptan such as Rizatriptan (Maxalt) as well. Other options for waking migraines would be DHE (Migranal nasal spray or injection), or one of the new gepants (Nurtec ODT, Ubrelvy) since they can still be effective if taken up to 4 hours past the migraine onset, which is really great and expands the migraine onset treatment window. A neuromodulatory device could also be considered.

 

If you are averaging more than 4 migraines per month, a daily preventive treatment is generally recommended. There are many options for this including a daily pill, natural supplements, a once monthly or quarterly CGRP monoclonal antibody (Aimovig, Ajovy, Emgality, Vyepti), Botox, or a neuromodulatory device.

 

 

2) CLUSTER HEADACHE

Cluster headache is another classic cause of wake up headaches. It is a very distinct form of headache that is easy to pick out with its characteristics. Cluster headache is classified as a trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia (TAC). There are 4 types of TAC syndromes, and cluster headache is the most common of them. The other 3 TAC syndromes are hemicrania continua, paroxysmal hemicrania, and SUNCT/SUNA, none of which are waking headache types. There are some overlapping characteristics between all 4 of these TAC headache types, but cluster headache is the only one that often wakes the patient from sleep.

 

Cluster headaches can occur anytime during the day, but classically occur at the same time every night, often waking the patient up from sleep, many times shortly after falling asleep within an hour or two. Men tend to be affected 3 times more than women, but it is seen in both men and women. It is a severely painful headache, and has been termed “suicide headache” at times because of the pain severity.

 

Cluster headache is characterized by attacks of severe unilateral (one-sided) orbital (around the eye), supraorbital (above the eye), and/or temporal pain lasting 15 to 180 minutes if untreated. There is either agitation/restlessness with the headache attack and/or at least 1 autonomic sign or symptom on the side of the headache [lacrimation (runniness/tearing of the eye), conjunctival injection (redness of the eye), facial sweating or flushing (skin turning blushed), nasal congestion, rhinorrhea (runniness of nose), sense of ear fullness, eyelid edema (swelling), or partial Horner’s syndrome (miosis (pupil becomes small)) and/or ptosis (droopiness of the eye)]. Headache attacks typically occur from 1 every other day to 8 per day for more than half the time during a cluster cycle. Chronic cluster headache is defined by attacks that occur for more than 1 year without remission, or with remission periods lasting less than 1 month.

 

Cluster headache attacks occur in “clusters”, or cycles, of frequent headache attacks. These cycles of cluster attacks may last for weeks or months before they go away completely. Remission periods can last months to years. Cluster cycles often occur at a predictable time of year, such as season changes (Fall and Spring are most common).

 

Treatments for cluster headache are discussed here. In general, at the onset of a cluster cycle, a course of high dosed Prednisone is often started over 1-2 weeks to try to break up or shorten the cycle. An abortive option is also mandatory, and the most effective options are oxygen by a face mask, injectable Sumatriptan (Imitrex), nasal Zolmitriptan (Zomig) or Sumatriptan (Imitrex), or DHE (Migranal nasal spray or injection). A preventive daily treatment is also typically started at the onset of a cluster cycle and there are a variety of options for this.

3) HYPNIC HEADACHE

Hypnic headache has also been called “alarm clock” headache because it often wakes the person up at almost exactly the same time every night. These recurrent attacks occur only during sleep, causing wakening. They typically occur on 10 or more days per month for more than 3 months. The headache lasts 15 minutes and up to 4 hours after waking. This headache usually begins after age 50, but can occur in younger ages too.

 

The pain is typically mild to moderate, but can be severe occasionally. The pain usually occurs on both sides of the head (as opposed to cluster headache which is 1 sided). There is no restlessness during the headache (as opposed to cluster headache). Hypnic headache is NOT associated with autonomic symptoms [lacrimation (runniness/tearing of the eye), conjunctival injection (redness of the eye), facial sweating or flushing (skin turning blushed), nasal congestion, rhinorrhea (runniness of nose), sense of ear fullness, eyelid edema (swelling), or partial Horner’s syndrome (miosis (pupil becomes small)) and/or ptosis (droopiness of the eye)] (as opposed to cluster headache which requires these autonomic symptoms for diagnostic criteria).

 

Treatments for cluster headache are discussed here. The most common treatments are some caffeine before bed (in those who can tolerate it and not cause insomnia), or upon waking. Indomethacin taken before bed is also a common treatment.

 

4) OCCIPITAL NEURALGIA

Occipital neuralgia is a miserable nagging soreness, pain, and headache in the back of the head. I tell patients to think of occipital neuralgia as “sciatica of the head”. It is sometimes associated with cervicogenic headache (headache originating from the cervical spine with associated prominent neck pain), but more commonly occurs by itself. It is typically felt in the suboccipital region (where the base of the skull meets the top of the neck) and radiates variably into the back and top of the head and behind the ears. It can less commonly even radiate to the frontal areas (by the trigeminocervical circuitry in the upper cervical spinal cord and brainstem). It can be one sided or both sides. The pain is often described as an intense stabbing, sharp, shooting, shocking, or burning pain. It often occurs in attacks of pain which may last seconds to minutes, but can also be a continuous unrelenting pain. Sometimes it may not be as intense and may be a lower-level pain such as pressure, aching, soreness or throbbiness. Some patients may have a sensation of numbness or tingling in the back of the head. Associated neck pain is typically in the mix too. The back of the head in the area where the skull meets the neck often feels very sore or tender along the ridge of the skull bone. The pain and tenderness often increase by pushing on the back of the head and along the skull base, or lying on the back of the head. Thus, for some patients, when they lie on the back of the head during sleep, it puts pressure on the occipital nerves and they continue to get more irritated and painful until they may wake the person up from sleep due to the pain.

 

Treatment for occipital neuralgia is discussed in much greater deal here and here. In general, first line options are neck physical therapy to this area, as well as an anti-neuritic pain medication such a tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) of Amitriptyline (Elavil) or Nortriptyline (Pamelor), an anticonvulsant such as Gabapentin (Neurontin), or an SSRI such as Duloxetine (Cymbalta) or Venlafaxine XR (Effexor XR).

 

 

5) SLEEP APNEA HEADACHE:

Sleep apnea is a common cause of a headache present upon waking in the morning. However, in comparison to the headache types listed above, this headache does not “wake you up”, but rather, you “wake up with it”. It generally fades away as the morning goes on and most often has tension type headache characteristics. So if you snore, often feel unrefreshed when you wake up in the morning, and this is associated with a headache, wake with a sore throat or dry mouth, a conversation with your doctor about possible obstructive sleep apnea evaluation should be pursued. If your bed partner witnesses times where you seem to stop breathing during sleep, then this is very likely. Sleep apnea is associated with elevated high blood pressure and increased risk of stroke and heart attack, so it is important to not let it go untreated. During the deep stages of sleep, your brain is replenishing its neurotransmitters. So, if you are not getting into those deep stages because the sleep apnea is disrupting progression through normal sleep stages, fatigue, memory and cognitive complaints are common.

 

Treatment varies depending on the severity of the sleep apnea. This is determined by an overnight sleep study called a polysomnogram. These have historically been done in a controlled setting such as a hotel room, but they are now commonly done remotely in your own bed from home too.

 

 

6) HEADACHE ATTRIBUTED TO INTRACRANIAL NEOPLASM (BRAIN TUMOR)

Lastly, brain tumor is always in the differential (and at the very top of everyone’s mind when they come in the office), depending on age, prior headache history, and other clinical symptoms. These headaches are typically associated with some other neurological complaints or findings on neurological exam such as vision deficit, imbalance, speech dysfunction, memory or cognitive impairment, or one-sided numbness or weakness. However, this isn’t an absolute, and headaches can certainly present by just themselves as well. With all of that said, this is an uncommon reason for wake up headache or headache in general, surprisingly. Thus, why I have listed it last. However, it is still a reason that you should always be evaluated by your doctor for not only wake up headaches, but for any headache, especially if you don’t have a prior history of headaches, it is a different type of headache from your prior headaches, or you have any associated neurological symptoms.

 

These are certainly not the only causes of nocturnal headaches, but they are typically the top 6 that are evaluated for first. Disorders such as nocturnal bruxism (teeth grinding and jaw clenching) and TMJ dysfunction, or headache attributed to temporomandibular disorder can also be a contributor to headaches. However, these types of disorders don’t typically cause the patient to wake up with the pain. In addition, the pain is primarily in the temples, in the areas in front of the ear, into the face, and in the master muscles in the jaw. The headaches related to this are more often a tension type headache in description and not severe, and an ache and soreness in the jaw muscles and around the TMJ regions. A dentist should be able to easily diagnose if there is significant nocturnal bruxism happening by evaluating the teeth. Bed partners are also good historians on observations of teeth grinding during sleep.

 

IF YOU HAVE HEADACHE, MIGRAINE, OR FACIAL PAIN AND ARE LOOKING FOR ANSWERS ON ANYTHING RELATED TO IT, A HEADACHE SPECIALIST IS HERE TO HELP, FOR FREE!

FIRST, LET’S DECIDE WHERE TO START:

IF YOU HAVE AN EXISTING HEADACHE, MIGRAINE, OR FACIAL PAIN DIAGNOSIS AND ARE LOOKING FOR THE LATEST INFORMATION, HOT TOPICS, AND TREATMENT TIPS, VISIT OUR FREE BLOG OF HOT TOPICS AND HEADACHE TIPS HERE. THIS IS WHERE I WRITE AND CONDENSE A BROAD VARIETY OF COMMON AND COMPLEX  MIGRAINE AND HEADACHE RELATED TOPICS INTO THE IMPORTANT FACTS AND HIGHLIGHTS YOU NEED TO KNOW, ALONG WITH PROVIDING FIRST HAND CLINICAL EXPERIENCE FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF A HEADACHE SPECIALIST.

 

IF YOU DON’T HAVE AN EXISTING HEADACHE, MIGRAINE, OR FACIAL PAIN DIAGNOSIS AND ARE LOOKING FOR POSSIBLE TYPES OF HEADACHES OR FACIAL PAINS BASED ON YOUR SYMPTOMS, USE THE FREE HEADACHE AND FACIAL PAIN SYMPTOM CHECKER TOOL DEVELOPED BY A HEADACHE SPECIALIST NEUROLOGIST HERE!

 

IF YOU HAVE AN EXISTING HEADACHE, MIGRAINE, OR FACIAL PAIN DIAGNOSIS AND ARE LOOKING FOR FURTHER EDUCATION AND SELF-RESEARCH ON YOUR DIAGNOSIS, VISIT OUR FREE EDUCATION CENTER HERE.

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