Posts Tagged "headache locations"

Last updated on October 1st, 2021 at 01:12 pm

HEADACHE CHART AND HEADACHE LOCATION MEANING FOR DIFFERENT TYPES OF HEADACHES.

@Neuralgroover

 

I can picture it now. You’re sitting there late at night breaking out into a cold sweat, heart racing, convincing yourself a brain tumor is the cause of your headache as you are Googling a variety of terms for your headache location meaning such as…




…temple headache, headache behind eye, headache behind eyes, headache on top of head, headache in the temples, headache back of head, headache in front of head, headache on one side, front of head headache, headache on right side, headache on left side, headache in temple, headache forehead, pain behind eye, headache behind the eyes, headache and nausea, pain behind eyes, headache on left side of head, headache on right side of head, headache in back of head, front head headache, headache temple, headache at the front of head, stomach upset, left side headache, right side headache, headache behind right eye, temples headache, headache behind left eye, nausea and headache, pain in head, sharp pain in head, neck pain and headache, constant headache, head pressure, ice-pick headache, headache front, pressure headache, sex headache, exertion headache, cough headache, right temple headache, left temple headache, throbbing headache, headache meaning location, frontal headache, types of headaches diagram, headache types chart, pounding headache, headache locations chart, headaches in eyes, pain top of head, headache above left eye, headache map, headache above right eye, etc., etc., etc…

 

Ok, I think you get the point. Sound familiar? Now that you’ve earned your honorary Doctor Google degree, let me help provide some direction for you and your headache self-research quest to determine types of headaches and location, areas of headaches, and headache location meaning.

 

But let me tell you a BIG secret…

 

Headaches are not diagnosed based only on their location. They are diagnosed by the “company they keep”. In other words, the characteristics, patterns, and associated symptoms that go with the headache are the more important key pieces of information which narrow down the most likely headache types. Headache location by itself without any other information is actually quite useless. The International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD3) classifies every headache type according to the headache and all of the associated features. Each headache type must match a specific set of characteristics and associated symptoms set forth in the criteria, and headache location is only one of many features taken into account.

 

By combining the headache location with associated symptoms, patterns, and characteristics of the headache, it can then be more accurately narrowed down. This in turn makes choosing the correct treatment more accurate and effective. This is absolutely key. The end result is that you are on the more appropriate path to improvement rather than someone throwing “headache” pills randomly at a headache that they haven’t given a specific name to, and the treatment they are using may not be the treatment that your specific type of headache needs (and sometimes it can even make it worse). I see this scenario in my headache clinic every day given the shortage of headache specialists. This is why I created a FREE headache and facial pain symptom checker as discussed further down.

 

Let’s take migraine as just one example, which is discussed in much greater detail here. Migraine can vary widely in its location between patients and between attacks within the same patient. Any one of those Googled headache location terms listed at the top could potentially represent migraine. Those locations could also represent many other specific types of headaches as well, and they would require a much different type of treatment or evaluation than migraine would. The headache location doesn’t fully match with migraine until you combine it with the required criteria of associated symptoms that make the migraine diagnosis which may include a combination of symptoms such as nausea, sensitivity to light (photophobia), sensitivity to sound (phonophobia), throbbing or pounding pain, moderate to severe pain intensity, worsening with exercise, one sided predominance, and of course ruling out other more concerning “secondary” causes of the headaches. So clearly, Googling the headache location alone doesn’t help you figure out the cause or type of the headache at all, nor the most effective treatment. The bottom line is that location of pain alone doesn’t narrow down the type of headache or facial pain that you have. The associated symptoms and patterns that go with the headache are the keys to the possible headache types.

 

Thus, I created a FREE headache and facial pain symptom checker. The purpose is to help you with more personalized self-research with a list of possible headache types to discuss with your local doctor in hopes of helping you and your doctor have a better discussion of possible headache types, as well as better treatment considerations. Remember, any type of headache and facial pain requires an office visit and physical examination with your doctor. This symptom checker tool is purely educational to provoke thinking of a variety of headache possibilities. However, bad causes of headache can present as mild and simple headache disorders such as migraine. So, a visit to your doctor to evaluate your headache is a mandatory step that you must do.

 

When you are trying to narrow down the type of headache or facial pain you may have, these are the additional characteristics and symptoms that you need to take into consideration, and are the key questions a headache specialist will ask you in the office. Go through the following list of headache features, think about each one, and write down your responses. If you have different types of headaches, it is important to focus on and think about only one type at a time (even though they are typically different manifestations of the same underlying headache disorder).




1) Location of pain.

As mentioned above, pain location is only one of many important characteristics of a headache disorder, but without factoring in the associated symptoms, patterns, and characteristics, it is quite useless alone. I have broken down 8 general patterns of headache and facial pain locations to choose from. Go through the following headache location charts and pick the one that is most consistent with your headache or facial pain location. These are screenshots from the first step of the headache and facial pain symptom checker algorithm. There may be some variation to your attacks and the location may vary between different attacks, so pick the one which summarizes the areas involved overall for the particular type of headache you are analyzing.

Forehead, Cheek, Temporal (not variable)

  • The headache is 100% always on 1 side only.
  • It never alternates between 1 side and the other side.
  • It never involves both sides of the head at the same time.

Forehead, Cheek, Temporal (variable)

  • The headache is variable in location.
  • It may alternate between 1 side or the other side of the head at different times.
  • It may commonly occur more often on 1 side or the other, however, it is not 100% always on the same side.
  • It may sometimes involve both sides of the head at the same time as well.

Chin

  • Beneath the angle of the lower jaw, back of the throat or tonsils, back/base of the tongue, inside ear, or deep in the ear.

Parietal-Occipital (not variable)

  • The headache is 100% always on 1 side ONLY.
  • It NEVER alternates between 1 side and the other side.
  • It NEVER involves both sides of the head at the same time.

Parietal-Occipital (variable)

  • The headache is variable in location.
  • It may alternate between 1 side or the other side at different times.
  • It may commonly occur more often on 1 side or the other. However, it is not 100% always on the same side.
  • It may sometimes involve both sides of the head at the same time as well.

Whole Side of Head (not variable) (Forehead, Cheek, Temporo-Parietal-Occipital)

  • The headache is 100% always on 1 side only.
  • It never alternates between 1 side and the other side.
  • It never involves both sides of the head at the same time.

Whole Side of Head (variable) ((Forehead, Cheek, Temporo-Parietal-Occipital)

  • The headache is variable in location.
  • It may alternate between 1 side or the other side at different times.
  • It may commonly occur more often on 1 side or the other. However, it is not always on the same side. 
  • It may sometimes involve both sides of the head at the same time as well.

Whole Head (not variable) (Forehead, Cheek, Temporo-Parietal-Occipital On Both Sides At the Same Time) 

  • The headache is never on 1 side only. It always involves the whole head on both sides at the same time. 

2) Frequency of the headache or facial pain attacks.

How often do the attacks of headache of facial pain occur? Once per day and several days per month, 8 different attacks per day, etc.? Is there a pattern to the attacks, such as a seasonal occurrence?

 

3) Duration of the headache or facial pain attacks.

When you get an attack of headache or facial pain, how long does each individual attack last until it goes away completely if it is untreated or unsuccessfully treated? 30 minutes, greater than 4 hours, 15 minutes, several days, etc.?

 

4) Description and characterization of the headache or facial pain.

How would you describe the pain of the headache or facial pain if you had to put it into words? Throbbing, pounding, pulsating, achy, excruciating, pressure, electrical, shock, burning, sharp, stabbing, ice pick stabbing, etc.?

 

5) Associated neurological symptoms.

Is the headache associated with visual disturbances such as lost vision, flashing lights, shapes, zig-zags, colors, wavy lines, kaleidoscope, jagged edges, etc.? Is there numbness or tingling in an area of the body associated with a headache attack such as on one side of the face and body? Is there weakness on one side of the body with the headache? Are there problems speaking or getting words out with a headache attack?

 

6) Additional symptoms.

Is your stomach upset or do you feel nauseated or sick to your stomach with a headache attack? Do you vomit? Do you feel sensitive to bright light and/or loud sound when the headache is at its worst (where you would prefer to be in a dark quiet area if you had the chance)? Does an eye turn red or tear excessively during a headache attack? Does your nose run or get congested on one side during a headache attack? Does your eyelid droop on one side or does it get puffy around an eye on one side with a headache attack?

 

When you are done going through and thinking about all of these headache characteristics, patterns, and associated symptoms, take a run through this FREE headache and facial pain symptom checker algorithm questionnaire which I created to help you with more personalized self-research with a list of possible headache types and treatments to discuss with your local doctor. From there, you will be directed to the most common and effective treatments for you and your doctor to consider together, which vary widely depending on the specific type of headache. For example, for migraine there are a wide variety of effective treatments for aborting (taking something “as needed” to stop) a migraine attack including triptansgepants (Ubrelvy, Nurtec), ditans (Reyvow), and neuromodulatory devices, If the frequency of attacks is high, there are many effective  preventive migraine treatments consisting of medications, CGRP monoclonal antibody (mAb) treatments (Aimovig, Ajovy, Emgality, Vyepti), Botox, natural supplements, herbals and vitaminsneuromodulatory devices, yoga and meditation, acupuncture, acupressure and pressure points.

 

Good luck, and I hope this tool leads you in a better direction of more educational and useful discussions with your doctor regarding possible headache types and more effective treatment considerations!

 

Do me a HUGE favor and if you have found this headache symptom checker tool helpful and it led to a more successful outcome of narrowing down your headache types and treatments when you saw your local doctor, PLEASE let me know and drop me a message here or on Twitter!!




 

IF YOU HAVE HEADACHE, MIGRAINE, OR FACIAL PAIN AND ARE LOOKING FOR ANSWERS ON ANYTHING RELATED TO IT, A HEADACHE SPECIALIST IS HERE TO HELP, FOR FREE!

FIRST, LET’S DECIDE WHERE TO START:

IF YOU HAVE AN EXISTING HEADACHE, MIGRAINE, OR FACIAL PAIN DIAGNOSIS AND ARE LOOKING FOR THE LATEST INFORMATION, HOT TOPICS, AND TREATMENT TIPS, VISIT OUR FREE BLOG OF HOT TOPICS AND HEADACHE TIPS HERE. THIS IS WHERE I WRITE AND CONDENSE A BROAD VARIETY OF COMMON AND COMPLEX  MIGRAINE AND HEADACHE RELATED TOPICS INTO THE IMPORTANT FACTS AND HIGHLIGHTS YOU NEED TO KNOW, ALONG WITH PROVIDING FIRST HAND CLINICAL EXPERIENCE FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF A HEADACHE SPECIALIST.

 

IF YOU DON’T HAVE AN EXISTING HEADACHE, MIGRAINE, OR FACIAL PAIN DIAGNOSIS AND ARE LOOKING FOR POSSIBLE TYPES OF HEADACHES OR FACIAL PAINS BASED ON YOUR SYMPTOMS, USE THE FREE HEADACHE AND FACIAL PAIN SYMPTOM CHECKER TOOL DEVELOPED BY A HEADACHE SPECIALIST NEUROLOGIST HERE!

 

IF YOU HAVE AN EXISTING HEADACHE, MIGRAINE, OR FACIAL PAIN DIAGNOSIS AND ARE LOOKING FOR FURTHER EDUCATION AND SELF-RESEARCH ON YOUR DIAGNOSIS, VISIT OUR FREE EDUCATION CENTER HERE.

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